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Abstract: Future-Proofing Our Thinking – Peter Ellerton

peterellerton_wideweb__470x313,0Thinking well is a complex business.  Many thinking skills need to be learned and developed, and not all of them are well articulated or clearly identified in curricula; even then, the frames in which we think are often created by others, sometimes accidentally, limiting the range of possible solutions and inhibiting our effectiveness.  Our thinking, both individual and collective, needs a value shift from knowledge to inquiry to meet the needs of a future in which the only certainty is that we don’t know what we’ll need to know.  How this can be achieved is the focus of Peter’s work.

Peter is director of the University of Queensland Critical Thinking Project. His research focuses on the nature and teaching of critical thinking. He has worked for many years as a curriculum head of science, mathematics and philosophy in high schools and is a consultant to the International Baccalaureate Organisation in the design and implementation of science curriclua. He won the 2008 Australian Skeptics $10,000 prize for Critical Thinking for his work in developing educational resources, and he was not improved by being faith-healed on national television.

More on Peter Ellerton Here

Speaker: Peter Ellerton

PhD Candidate in Educational Philosophy

Peter is director of the University of Queensland Critical Thinking Project. His research focuses on the nature and teaching of critical thinking. He has worked for many years as a curriculum head of science, mathematics and philosophy in high schools and is a consultant to the International Baccalaureate Organisation in the design and implementation of science curriclua. He won the 2008 Australian Skeptics $10,000 prize for Critical Thinking for his work in developing educational resources, and he was not improved by being faith-healed on national television.

 

Just Think – It’s Important

Why is philosophy as a subject such a fizzer in schools, asks Laura Parker.

For Said Bouziane, a year 11 student, using deductive logic is as easy as stacking chairs.

“One day after class I noticed a student pick up a pile of five chairs and place them on a pile of two. I wondered how many times this student chose the bigger, heavier, more troublesome pile of chairs,” he said.

Pondering reason and logic is a normal part of Said’s day at Calamvale Community College in Brisbane, where he studies philosophy under the guidance of teacher Peter Ellerton.

A former physics teacher, Mr Ellerton introduced the philosophy and critical thinking program to Calamvale after joining a network of Queensland teachers which promotes and spreads the teaching of philosophy in high schools throughout the state.

“Some people don’t understand what we mean by philosophy – they think it’s just discussion,” Mr Ellerton said. “The truth is it’s a rigorous and analytical subject; you have to do it properly. We don’t discuss the meaning of life. As a subject, I think it’s more fundamental than maths or English.”

Read More at Sydney Morning Herald
 

Interview: Future Proof your Thinking

Part 1

[youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENZRZ9lAYAo”]

Part 2

Talk The Changing Changing Climate of Skepticism

Laureate Professor Peter Doherty in conversation with Peter Ellerton — Science, Scepticism and Society