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Speaker: Lloyd Hollenberg

3038picture_lloydHollenbergProfessor Lloyd Hollenberg works on theoretical quantum computing and information (Quantum computing, quantum information, qubit system modelling and control, alogorithm, quantum error correction, single electron transistor), as well as theory and implementation of quantum technology, including: quantum computer architectures, Quantum information processing, and Quantum communications systems. He is Deputy Director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology within the Department of Physics at the University of Melbourne.

(link) Abstract to Lloyd Hollenberg’s talk ‘Quantum reality bytes: the dawning age of quantum information technology – Lloyd Hollenberg’.

Professor Hollenberg has received many awards for his work in quantum sensing and quantum computing.

  • The 2013 Eureka Prize for Excellence in Interdisciplinary Scientific Research – see article ‘Shine on you tiny diamonds
  • The 2012 Walter Boas Medal for pioneering work in quantum sensing and quantum computing. In 2013, he was awarded an Australian Research Council Australian Laureate Fellowship and was part of the team that received the 2013 Eureka Prize for Excellence in Interdisciplinary Scientific Research. According to ABC’s Catalyst, his work is “a quantum leap in theoretical physics, that’s poised to make a huge impact in cell biology”.
  • The 2013 Victoria Prize for Science and Innovation in physical sciences (from VESKI – Victorian Government)

2013 Victoria Prize – Professor Lloyd Hollenberg

2013 Victoria Prize for Science & Innovation – physical sciences

id21881Imperfect diamonds could help answer fundamental questions in the life sciences, thanks to ground-breaking research by Victorian physicist, Professor Lloyd Hollenberg. In world first experiments, Professor Hollenberg and his team demonstrated nanodiamond quantum sensing technology in a living cell with sensitivity and resolution a million times greater than any conventional MRI system in the world.

The quantum sensor, a single atom defect in a diamond crystal called a nitrogen-vacancy centre, has the potential to revolutionise sensing and imaging at the atomic and molecular levels. The combination of the special properties of diamond and the quantum properties of the nitrogen-vacancy centre are one of nature’s remarkable coincidences and allows the device to detect the very small magnetic fields arising from individual atoms and molecules. With human life beginning and ending with atoms and molecules, a quantum sensor will provide us views of life at this fundamental level in a way never before experienced.

Internationally, there is huge interest in the potential of quantum technologies. Working at the convergence of quantum mechanics and biology, Professor Hollenberg is sparking a new era of nanoscale magnetic imaging with research spanning quantum physics, chemistry, bioengineering, materials science and biology. As a result, he and his team have demonstrated that sensors based on the strange rules of quantum mechanics can offer new tools to address important problems in biology.

Professor Hollenberg received the 2012 Walter Boas Medal for pioneering work in quantum sensing and quantum computing. In 2013, he was awarded an Australian Research Council Australian Laureate Fellowship and was part of the team that received the 2013 Eureka Prize for Excellence in Interdisciplinary Scientific Research. According to ABC’s Catalyst, his work is “a quantum leap in theoretical physics, that’s poised to make a huge impact in cell biology”.

imperfect diamonds - quantum sensingProfessor Hollenberg is Deputy Director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology within the Department of Physics at the University of Melbourne.
– taken from Science, Technology & Innovation – section of Business Victoria


For more information see:
(Nano-) diamonds are a boy’s best friend: Professor Lloyd Hollenberg and his Eureka Prize
Catalyst (video) : Imperfect Diamonds
2013 Victoria Prize for Science & Innovation – physical sciences
Fluorescent diamond nanocrystals offer new possibilities for biosensing in living cells

Quantum reality bytes: the dawning age of quantum information technology – Lloyd Hollenberg

Quantum Reality Bytes: the Dawning Age of Quantum Information Technology

3038picture_lloydHollenbergAbstract: Professor Hollenberg will give a quick intro to quantum mechanics, followed by quantum computing, quantum communication, and quantum sensing in biology.
This talk will explore the strange and beautiful world of Quantum Mechanics – multiple realities, absolute uncertainty, quantum computation, quantum communication and quantum sensing. Amazingly, with rapidly improving abilities to control single atoms and photons, we are beginning to glimpse the true nature of quantum reality. And now a completely new class of technology based on these strange rules is being developed, with possibly far reaching implications. No maths required – just bring curiosity about the world and an open mind.

Quantum Mechanics is the corner-stone theory of the physical world, which began with the ideas of Max Planck over a century ago. In recent years new and surprising aspects about quantum mechanics, and reality itself, have been uncovered as experiments probe further into the quantum realm. While we do not (and possibly cannot!) fully comprehend the sublime strangeness of quantum mechanics, a growing movement around the world seeks to harness the awesome processing power of microscopic systems obeying quantum laws. This is an international race for the new millennium to design and build new technology based on the spooky aspects of quantum mechanics, with enormous potential for communication, computing and imaging applications. Already quantum sensing of biological processes is becoming a reality, and ultra-secure quantum communication systems are being rolled-out around the world. The far flung future of this new quantum technology is the construction of a full-scale quantum computer, potentially a leap forward in information processing far greater than the development of the modern computer.


(link) Speaker’s Bio


Below is the abstract to a paper containing technical details of the project Lloyd Hollenberg is on at Melbourne Uni.

Quantum measurement and orientation tracking of fluorescent nanodiamonds inside living cells

L P McGuinness, Y Yan, A Stacey, D A Simpson, L T Hall, D Maclaurin, S Prawer, P Mulvaney, J Wrachtrup, F Caruso, R E Scholten, L C L Hollenberg
School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia.
Nature Nanotechnology (Impact Factor: 27.27). 01/2011; 6(6):358-63. DOI:10.1038/nnano.2011.64
Source: PubMed

Fluorescent particles are routinely used to probe biological processes. The quantum properties of single spins within fluorescent particles have been explored in the field of nanoscale magnetometry, but not yet in biological environments. Here, we demonstrate optically detected magnetic resonance of individual fluorescent nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy centres inside living human HeLa cells, and measure their location, orientation, spin levels and spin coherence times with nanoscale precision. Quantum coherence was measured through Rabi and spin-echo sequences over long (>10 h) periods, and orientation was tracked with effective 1° angular precision over acquisition times of 89 ms. The quantum spin levels served as fingerprints, allowing individual centres with identical fluorescence to be identified and tracked simultaneously. Furthermore, monitoring decoherence rates in response to changes in the local environment may provide new information about intracellular processes. The experiments reported here demonstrate the viability of controlled single spin probes for nanomagnetometry in biological systems, opening up a host of new possibilities for quantum-based imaging in the life sciences.

Full paper is available at Nature.
The abstract of an earlier paper related to this project below

Quantum measurement in living cells: Fluorescent diamond nanocrystals for biology

L. P. McGuinness, Y. Yan, A. Stacey, D. A. Simpson, L. T. Hall, D. Maclaurin, S. Prawer, P. Mulvaney, J. Wrachtrup, F. Caruso, R. E. Scholten, L. C. L. Hollenberg

01/2011; DOI:10.1109/IQEC-CLEO.2011.6194042

ABSTRACT We have demonstrated optically detected magnetic resonance of individual fluorescent nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy centres inside living human HeLa cells, and measured their spin levels and spin coherence times while tracking their location and orientation with nanoscale precision. Quantum coherence was measured through Rabi and spin-echo sequences over long (>10 h) periods, and orientation was tracked with 1° angular precision in 89 ms acquisition time. Individual centres were identified optically by their electron spin resonance spectrum, allowing simultaneous tracking of many otherwise identical flourescent particles. In addition, variation in the decoherence rates was linked to changes in the local environment inside the cells, representing a new non-destructive imaging modality for intracellular biology.

Full paper at Research Gate



For more information see:
(Nano-) diamonds are a boy’s best friend: Professor Lloyd Hollenberg and his Eureka Prize
Catalyst (video) : Imperfect Diamonds
2013 Victoria Prize for Science & Innovation – physical sciences
Paper: Quantum measurement and orientation tracking of fluorescent nanodiamonds inside living cells